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April

Pre-Math and the Art of Joke-Telling

April: Knock knock.

Grandma (on phone): Who's there?

April: Banana.

Grandma: Banana who?

April: Knock knock.

Grandma: Who's there?

April: Banana.

Grandma: Banana who?

April: Knock knock.

Grandma: Who's there?

April: Banana.

Grandma: Banana who?

April: Knock knock.

Grandma: Who's there?

April: Orange. See, I said the wrong thing because it's not in a pattern!

Comments

The way I learned that joke, at about the same age, the last line is "Orange you glad I didn't say banana again?"
That's how she was taught the joke. She made her own modification.
Oh, I thought she made it up. Reinventing the wheel in a way.
But I forgot to say, I did recognize the math concepts she's clearly been working on in preschool, having taught them myself . . .
Brilliant child. Soon, she may veer away from literal interpretations of humor into the absurd:

Q. What's brown and sticky?
A. A stick.

Q. What's red and invisible?
A. No tomatoes.

Q. What's yellow and very dangerous?
A. Shark-infested custard.
She might be a little inexperienced to understand this version:

Knock, knock.

Who's there?

Philip Glass. Knock, knock.

Who's there?

Philip Glass. Knock, knock.

Who's there?

Philip Glass. (repeat ad infinitum)
:)

This is why we need diacritical marks...

Because shouldn't the "Philip Glass" be slightly different each time?

PHILip glass.
philIP glass.
PHILop glass.
philip GLASS.

;)

(But now I know the equivalent to the math joke: "Aleph-null bottles of beer on the wall, Aleph-null bottles of beer; take one down, pass it around, aleph-null bottles of beer on the wall.")