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reading tiger

Reading the "Buttercup's Baby" after-portion of The Princess Bride makes it exceedingly obvious that part of what William Goldman is satirizing is the experience of reading The Big Novels of the 19th Century. What nailed it for me was Goldman-the-abridger's griping that he'd cut a 65-page treatise on Florinese trees that he had learned through his researches was placed there, just before a cliffhanger, because Morgenstern was upset at the razing of the flora on his country estate and he wanted to make sure you read every single word of it. Having just read several of those Big Novels in the recent past, I am pleased to discover that I'm reading the Princess Bride at just the right point, then, to really appreciate this particular aspect.

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